Anthony Archibald - Autoharp - Autoharp: Green Door (Including lyrics and chords) Jan's challenge on UK Autoharps for July was "colours". I have uploaded this song accompanied on my guitar, but decided to give it a go on the autoharp for this challenge. Only four chords needed which for me are: F; F7; Bb; and C7. "Green Door" was written by Bob “Hutch” Davie and Marvin Moore. It was recorded by Jim Lowe in 1956 in USA, and by Frankie Vaughan in the UK and re-recorded by Shakin’ Stevens in 1981. I have based my interpretation on the Frankie Vaughan version which is the first one I remember hearing back in the days of "steam radio", or "wireless". :-)
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Autoharp: Green Door (Including lyrics and chords) Jan's challenge on UK Autoharps for July was "colours". I have uploaded this song accompanied on my guitar, but decided to give it a go on the autoharp for this challenge. Only four chords needed which for me are: F; F7; Bb; and C7. "Green Door" was written by Bob “Hutch” Davie and Marvin Moore. It was recorded by Jim Lowe in 1956 in USA, and by Frankie Vaughan in the UK and re-recorded by Shakin’ Stevens in 1981. I have based my interpretation on the Frankie Vaughan version which is the first one I remember hearing back in the days of "steam radio", or "wireless". :-)
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Guitar: Forty Miles (Including lyrics and chords) My song today from the BBC programme "Singing Together" is a very familiar story in folk music with various twists at the end. Among the footnotes in Joe Offers' archive of songs from Singing Together is the following: "The earliest English version of this delightful piece is a street ballad issued in the reign of James II (1685-88) under the title of John's Earnest Request; Or, Betty's Compassionate Love extended to him in a time of distress." Two copies of this, printed for P. Brooksby between 1672 and 1696, can be seen at "Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads". You might wonder why I play this in the key of D but use my capo at the second fret and use chords for the key of C. The reason for this is that the key of D suits my voice better than C, but I am able to pick out the accompaniment better using the C chords.
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Guitar; The Foggy Dew (Including lyrics and chords) My song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" today is "The Foggy Dew". I have uploaded songs with this same title or a variant on it previously, but have not come across this version. "The Foggy Foggy Dew" is the one I first learned and is virtually the same story as this one. The other song "The Foggy Dew" is an Irish song totally unrelated to this story. This variant was published with the following footnotes: Source: The Foggy Dew, Ed Frank Purslow, 1973 Notes: Hammond Sm.30; collected from Mrs Gulliver, Combe Florey, Somerset. May 1905 Frank Purslow's notes follow: Another old favourite, but now sung mostly around the folk clubs; traditional versions are hard to come by these days. A great many people have sought to invest the "foggy dew" with some sort of symbolism. What meaning the phrase does have seems fairly obvious, and I feel quite sure that country singers who sang this song did so without a thought for any hidden meanings. With all due respect to A.L. Lloyd, I find his "Bugaboo" theory as unconvincing as the rest. What if one of Bell's Tynesiders did ascribe the girl's fear to the mock-ghostly "Bogle-bo"? It probably merely indicates that one singer, at least, preferred his songs' sentiments to be rationalised - or else he had a higher-developed sense of humour than his neighbours. As "The Foggy Dew" the song appeared on late 18th century English broadsides. My own theory - which, if true, would probably prove A.L. Lloyd right! - is that the song originated in Ireland (again!)
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Guitar: Flower of Killarney (Including lyrics and chords) My song today "Flower of Killarney", comes from the Autumn 1970 edition of the BBC programme "Singing Together" and has the following footnotes: Source: Singing Together, Autumn 1970, BBC Publications Notes: In the booklet, this is simply listed as 'Irish Folk Tune', and no information is given about the lyrics. The tune is Gentle Maiden, which Edward Bunting got from a Miss Murphy of Dublin, in 1839: many songs have subsequently been set to it. Play it faster and its close relationship to Rosin the Beau becomes clear. The tune-family that includes both goes back a fair way in both Ireland and Britain, but Bunting's opinion that it is "ancient" and "pure Irish" was based solely on his theories on the structure of Irish melody, which Alfred Moffat (The Minstrelsy of Ireland, 4th edition, nd [the 1st edition was 1897], note to Thomas Moore's 'Oh! Love is a hunter boy') described as "often refuted"; and in those days "refuted" still meant "disproven". The words quoted in Singing Together are as printed in Desmond MacMahon, The New National Songbook Part II, London: Thomas Nelson & Sons Ltd, 1939; where they are described as "20th Cent[ury]". The song was issued by Elkin & Co in 1954 as sheet music arranged for SATB by Desmond MacMahon "with words by A[lfred] H Body" (COPAC listing)
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Autoharp: Sand (Including lyrics and chords) A post from one of my friends from Moniaive in Scotland, (Maggie MacBean), drew my attention to this song which must have passed me by in my younger days as I do not recall it and I loved Nancy Sinatra. However, I only had the one LP of hers and although she did perform "Some Velvet Morning" with Lee Hazlewood, this one was not on that album. Lee Hazlewood wrote "Sand" and first performed it with Jane Hokum in March 1966 before his performance with Nancy Sinatra in May the same year. For my attempt at the song, having no female partner to sing it with, I have sung the male part in as low a register as I can manage, then sung the female part an octave higher. In the annotations, the male part is printed in white lettering, the female in pink.
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Guitar: Flow Gently Sweet Afton (Including lyrics and chords) Flow Gently Sweet Afton is a poem by Robert Burns, written in 1789. It has been set to many tunes, this one being the one shown in the BBC programme "Singing Together" summer 1951 pamphlet.
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Guitar: Flora, Lily of the West (Including lyrics and chords) "Flora, Lily of the West" is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" and has the following footnotes in the pamphlet: Source: Songs of the West by S. Baring-Gould. Notes: Baring-Gould Notes: Two melodies have been noted down to this ballad, one from Matthew Baker, the old cripple on Lew Down, the other from Samuel Fone. The first one is identical with one obtained in Yorkshire by Mr Kidson. The words are on Broadsheets by Such, Fortey, Bar of Leeds, etc. In the original the lover betrayed by Flora stabs to the heart the "lord of high degree" who has supplanted him - "I walked up to my rival with a dagger in my hand, And seized him from my false love, and bid him boldly stand; Then, mad with desperation, I swore I'd pierce his breast, And I was betrayed by Flora, the Lily of the West." He is tried for murder, but "a flaw was in the indictment found," and he escapes the gallows. And the ballad winds up - "Although she swore my life away, she still disturbs my rest. I must ramble for my Flora, the Lily of the West" I have thought it well to cut out the murder and the trial. The ballad has clearly an Irish origin, what air is used in Ireland I am unable to say. It has been generally accepted that the ending of a phrase on the same three notes is characteristic Irish music. It is not more so than English folk airs. "Flora, the Lily of the West" was wont to be sung annually at the Revel at St Breward's on the Bodmin Moors, and can be traced back there to 1839. There Henry Hawken, sexton at Mickalstow, hard by, acquired it, and from him the first melody was taken down as well as by the Rev. W.J. Wyon, vicar of St Issey, in 1889. The tune given here is as collected from Matthew Baker. See Flora, The Lily Of The West(2) from "Related Songs" below for the tune collected from Samuel Fone.
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Guitar: Flight of the Earls {A P Graves} (Including lyrics and chords) My song today from the BBC programme "Singing Together" is "Flight of the Earls" written by A.P.Graves with music by C.V.Stanford and published in the Autumn 1969 pamphlet, though the song was originally published in "The Irish Song Book" in 1894. I uploaded another song with this same title, but it was a more recent composition written by Liam Reilly and although the title is the same, the two songs refer to different times; Graves' song relating to events of the seventeenth century while Reilly's song refers to the twentieth century. Stanford's melody was also used for another song I have uploaded some time ago, namely "The Boys of Wexford". The chords shown in the annotations work for strumming, but may not be exactly what I am playing finger-style.
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Autoharp: Gartan Mother's Lullaby (Including lyrics and chords) Today is my friend Corinna's birthday and as she is very fond of this song, I thought I would upload this version especially for her. Wikipedia has the following information about the song: "Gartan Mother's Lullaby" is an old Irish song and poem written by Herbert Hughes and Seosamh Mac Cathmhaoil, first published in Songs of Uladh [Ulster] in 1904. Hughes collected the traditional melody in Donegal the previous year and Campbell wrote the lyrics. The song is a lullaby by a mother, from the parish of Gartan in County Donegal. The song refers to a number of figures in Irish mythology, places in Ireland and words in the Irish language. Aoibheall, (pronounced "ee-val") commonly known as Aoibhinn the Beautiful, is the queen of the Northern Fairies. The Green Man, (or Fear Glas in Irish) it is said if you see him in the morning, "no ill follows"; but if at night, death or some other terrible misfortune will surely overtake you. He is sometimes called Fear Liath, or the Grey Man. Siabhra, is a generic term for an Irish fairy of any kind. In ancient writings the Tuatha de Danann, or little magicians of the Pagan Irish, were called "siabhra" without distinction. Tearmann, Irish for Termon, a village near Gartan in Donegal. Leanbhan, is an old Irish word for little child. (leanbh is Irish for child +án leanbhán is its diminutive.)
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Guitar: Diggin' up Bones (Including lyrics and chords) Requested by my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth, "Diggin' up Bones" is a song performed by Randy Travis and written by Al Gore, (no relation to the former Vice President of the USA), Paul Overstreet and Nat Stuckey. This song is not within my comfort zone, but I have given it a go anyway though my attempt at an instrumental break is nothing like the one you will find in Travis's own performance.
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Guitar:Flat River Raftsman (Including lyrics and chords) My song today from the BBC programme "Singing Together" comes from the Catskills as the small amount of information in the footnotes indicates: Source: Folk Song of the Catskills Cazden, Haufrecht and Studner ISBN: o-87385-580-3. Notes: Approved by Publisher as being avalaible to public. As the song is from the Catskills, it seems likely that the "Greenville" mentioned in verse one must have been Greenville Town on the northern border of Greene County, New York, in the United States. As this song only has three verses, I chose to repeat the first verse at the end to lengthen it.
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Guitar: Fill the Cup (Including lyrics and chords) I may have uploaded this song before, but this is the version printed in the BBC programme "Singing Together" and had the following footnote: Source: Singing Together, Autumn 1960, BBC Publications Notes: The caption says "Irish Tune, Words by Barbara Kluge". No further information is given. Well, if you don't know how to make a good cup of tea, here's how to do it. As usual, I have devised my own chord progression for the song.
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Guitar: Father Grumble (Including lyrics and chords) My song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" today is "Father Grumble". The following are from the footnotes to the song in the pamphlet: Source: Randolph, V, 1982. Ozark Folksongs, Illinois Press, Urbana Notes: Randoph wrote: Sung by Fanny Mulhollan, Pineville, Mo., Dec 21, 1927 An American derivative of the old Scottish "John Grumble" (Kittredge[1913]). See also Campbell and Sharp; Pound (1922); Cox (1925); Eddy; Gardner and Chickering; Linscott; Belden (1940); Brewster (1940a) and the Brown collection. Reported quite widely in tradition in Britain and Ireland; but chiefly in the USA and Canada. Found in Scotland as John Grumlie, and as The Wife of Auchtermuchty, which first appears in the Bannatyne MS (1568) as The Wyf of Auchtirmuchty. This is sometimes attributed to Sir John Moffat. Bruce Olson quotes the text, as published by Allan Ramsay in The Evergreen, 1723. Also quoted is Ballad of A Tyrannical Husband, from a MS of the time of Henry VII, Chetham Library, Manchester. As with most of the songs from the "Singing Together" pamphlets, I have made my own chord progression for my interpretation of the song.
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Guitar: Farmer's Daughter (On the Banks of Sweet Dundee) (Including lyrics and chords) Another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together", The Farmer's Daughter is also known as On the Banks of Sweet Dundee. The footnotes in the publication read: Source: Randolph, V, 1982. Ozark Folksongs, Illinois Press, Urbana Notes: Randolph wrote: Sung by Kate Stubblefield, Crane, Mo., May 7, 1928 The English broadside version of this song is known as "Undaunted Mary" and it is published in several popular songbooks. See Tolman and Eddy for detailked references and an Ohio fragment. Cox prints two West Virginia texts. In some versions of the ballad Willie does not die - as is implied by by the final lines of the sixth stanza of this text - but is reunited with Mary in the concluding verses.
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Autoharp: Happy Wanderer (Including lyrics and chords) Jan's challenge for July is for songs about our hobbies. Apart from singing and playing various musical instruments, my main hobbies are walking and photography. I thought this song covers all bases so to speak as I love singing, playing the autoharp and the camera I filmed this on is the one I use to take photographs on my walks. Wikipedia has the following information about "The Happy Wanderer": "The Happy Wanderer" ("Der fröhliche Wanderer" or "Mein Vater war ein Wandersmann") is a popular song. The original text was written by Florenz Friedrich Sigismund (1791–1877). The present tune was composed by Friedrich-Wilhelm Möller shortly after World War II. The work is often mistaken for a German folk song, but it is an original composition. Möller's sister Edith conducted a small amateur children's and youth choir in Schaumburg County, Northern Germany, internationally named Obernkirchen Children's Choir, in Germany named Schaumburger Märchensänger. She adapted Sigismund's words for her choir. In 1953, a BBC radio broadcast of the choir's winning performance at the Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod turned the song into an instant hit. On January 22, 1954, the song entered the UK singles chart and stayed on the chart—only a Top 12 at the time—for 26 non-consecutive weeks, peaking at Number 2 (for five consecutive weeks). The amateur choir, many of whose original members were war orphans, turned into an international phenomenon in the following years. The group performed on many international tours under the name Obernkirchen Children's Choir and recorded several albums. They made two appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show (November 29, 1964, and December 11, 1966).
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Guitar: The Farmyard (Including lyrics and chords) This song appears in the BBC programme "Singing Together" in their Autumn 1966 edition. The following footnote accompanies the song: The Farmyard, or The Merry Green Fields was noted by Cecil Sharp from Eliza Gardey, aged 74, at Marylebone Workhouse, London, on 22 October 1908 (Sharp MSS ref. Folk Tunes 1984). It was first printed in Sharp, English Folk-Songs for Schools, London: Novello, 1908-1925, No. 985. Also in Karpeles, Cecil Sharp's Collection of English Folk Songs, II, 425-426, with the singer's name given as "Goodey" (apparently a mistake). Number 745 in the Roud Folk Song Index, though it seems likely that the songs listed under 887 also belong with it. Something of a loose song family which also includes Old MacDonald and a stage song of 1706, In the Fields in Frost and Snows which appears in D'Urfey, Pills to Purge Melancholy (1719-1720, II, 214-16: from Thomas D'Urfey and William Worthen Appleton, Wonders in the sun; or, The kingdom of the birds: London, 1706).
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Guitar: Farewell to Tarwathie (Including lyrics and chords) Another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together", Farewell to Tarwathie" was published in the Spring 1986 edition simply as being from Scotland. In a discussion thread in Joe Offer's collection of these songs, the following appears: I have just read the discussion notes on this song Folk Songs and Ballads of Scotland' ISBN 0.8256.0057.X compiled and edited by Ewan MacColl, states that Farewell to Tarwathie was written by " George Scroggie, one time miller at Federate in the parish of New Deer Aberdeenshire wrote this song in the early eighteen fifties". As with most of the songs from this collection that I have attempted, I have made my own chord progression for it.
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Guitar: Maid of Monterey (Including lyrics and chords) A request from subscriber "Athul08" introduced this song to me. The song, "Maid of Monterey" is a 19th century song composed by John Hill Hewitt, published in Baltimore in 1851. The song depicts the Battle of Monterey (September 21-24, 1846), a major engagement of the Mexican-American War. A young Mexican maiden tends lovingly to wounded and dying soldiers even though they were her country's enemies. For my interpretation of the song, I have used a simple finger-style accompaniment and devised my own chord progression for it.
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Guitar: Farewell to Fiunary (Including lyrics and chords) Back to the BBC programme "Singing Together" for today's upload. "Farewell to Fiunary" was published in the Autumn 1971 pamphlet and in the footnotes it states: Described as "Traditional Scottish tune, Words by Rev. Norman Macleod." Taken from New Scottish Orpheus from Patterson's Publications, Ltd. In a "Discussion" section of Joe Offer's collection of songs from Singing Together is the following: "These words, attributed to my great grand father are a poor bastardization of his originals. If anyone wants I will be happy to send them the real ones. Maxwell MacLeod Fuinary Morvern." As with most of the songs from this collection, I have worked out my own chord progression for the song which I present here.
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Guitar: Daydream Believer (Including lyrics and chords) Another request from my young American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth, "Daydream Believer" is a song performed by "The Monkees", and written by J. Stewart. Wikipedia has a lengthy article about the group. The following are extracts from the article: The Monkees are an American rock and pop band originally active between 1966 and 1971, with reunion albums and tours in the decades that followed. Their original line-up consisted of the American actor/musicians Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork with English actor/singer Davy Jones. The group was conceived in 1965 by television producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider specifically for the situation comedy series The Monkees, which aired from 1966 to 1968. The band's music was initially supervised by record producer Don Kirshner, backed by the songwriting duo of Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. Dolenz described The Monkees as initially being "a TV show about an imaginary band... that wanted to be the Beatles that was never successful". Ironically, the success of the show led to the actor-musicians becoming one of the most successful bands of the 1960s. The Monkees have sold more than 75 million records worldwide making them one of the biggest selling groups of all time with international hits, including "Last Train to Clarksville", "Pleasant Valley Sunday", "Daydream Believer", and "I'm a Believer". Newspapers and magazines reported that the Monkees outsold the Beatles and the Rolling Stones combined in 1967, but Nesmith admitted in his autobiography Infinite Tuesday that it was a lie that he told a reporter. Playing the chorus, I experimented a little with the chord change from C to D by simply sliding the C chord shape up two frets. I also made an error when I attempted to put in a short instrumental break, and had to re-do it. I didn't manage to splice the join together well enough, please forgive!
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Guitar: Farewell My Own True Love (Including lyrics and chords) For my upload today I am returning to songs from the BBC programme "Singing Together". The song is "Farewell My Own True Love" and the only information that came with the pamphlet is that it is an American song. As with most of the songs I have uploaded from the "Singing Together" programmes, I have worked out my own chord progression for the accompaniment.
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Guitar: When the Boys Come Rolling Home (Including lyrics and chords) This is a song that passed me by as a younger man but which I have now recorded having been directed to it by subscriber "Jack Carter". Written by Tommy Sands, this song was recorded by The Dubliners and appears on their album "40 Years", though in their version they sing: "Sailing out of Dublin in the morning ..." where Sands wrote: "Sailing out of Belfast in the morning ..." which is what I sing.
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Guitar: Less of Me (Including lyrics and chords) A request from subscriber "RaZe Gorky" has led me to this Glen Campbell song which I had not come across before. Not only performed by Campbell, it was written by him too. The message of the song, think more of others than yourself I feel is particularly apt for the present worrying times, especially for those of us who are lucky enough to be fit and well and able to look after ourselves. Think about helping others who are less fortunate and find ways to help them get through this period of uncertainty.
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Autoharp: Where the River Shannon Flows (Including lyrics and chords) Requested by my friend from America, Ken Shuttlesworth, "Where the River Shannon Flows" was written in 1905 by James L Russell and was first recorded by Harry Macdonough in 1906. Many others have recorded it since then including John McCormack, Slim Whitman, Bing Crosby to name but a few. I have chosen to try it out on my autoharp and have made up my own chord progression for the song.
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Guitar: We're All Africans (Including lyrics and chords) This is a song written by Jim Wearne, a folk singer/song writer from America whose ancestors came from Cornwall. A few years ago there was a documentary broadcast on TV in which scientists studying DNA had come to the conclusion that all human beings have one ancestor in common if you trace their DNA back to its origins and they named that person as "Lucy". As "Lucy" was from Africa, it means that everybody in the world, regardless of their skin colour is from African stock, and this inspired Jim to write this song. I found it on SoundCloud about three years ago and Jim has been kind enough to share the lyrics with me and has given permission for me to do my own version and post it here on YouTube. I have made up my own chord progression for it.
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Guitar: Bonny Wood Green (Including lyrics and chords) Today's upload comes as a request from "Lainey Bechta". It is not a song I had heard before but I have given it a go using chords I have worked out myself as I was unable to find a source for them on the internet. The lyrics I found on a couple of sites and some of these indicated that the last two lines of each verse were repeated, but versions on YT all seemed to omit this repeat, so I have done so as well.
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Guitar: Voodoo Man (Including lyrics and chords) Like my last upload, "Bottom of the Sea", "Voodoo Man" is from the Jolly Rogers' CD, "XXV". Requested by subscriber "Rising Phoenix Paranormal", it gave me problems in that the videos that exist of it on YouTube are not available here in the Isle of Man for some reason known only to YT. I did managed to acquire the track through Amazon music and was therefore able to tell how the song goes. The chord progression I found on Ultimate Guitar.
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Guitar: Bottom of the Sea (Including lyrics and chords) Commenting on my version of a song by "The Jolly Rogers", namely "The Flying Dutchman", subscriber "Rising Phoenix Paranormal" asked if I would have a go at two more of their songs from the same CD, this being one of them. (The other, "Voodoo Man", I am working on). With the help of a site, "ChordU", with a little modification of my own, I have worked out a chord progression which seems to fit well enough and present them here.
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Guitar: I Shall Not Care (Including lyrics and chords) "I Shall Not Care" is a song written by Steve Lacey, my Canadian friend, from Yellowknife, Northern Territories. In his own words, this is a song he wrote in an attempt to create a folk style song with an Elizabethan feel to it. Yesterday, Steve sent me the lyrics and chords and gave me permission to share this on YouTube, so I recorded this version straight away.
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Guitar: Down Among the Canebrakes (Including lyrics and chords) Yesterday was my 75th birthday and as a present to myself, I bought an new guitar, a Harley Benton Line King-CE VS. This morning I have used it for this recording of a song requested by subscriber athull08, namely Stephen Foster's "Down Among the Canebrakes". This is one of Foster's songs with which I was not familiar, and the chord progression I am using is of my own devising. For those, like myself, who are not familiar with the term "canebrake", Wikipedia has the following: A canebrake or canebreak is a thicket of any of a variety of Arundinaria grasses: A. gigantea, A. tecta and A. appalachiana. As a bamboo, these giant grasses grow in thickets up to 24 ft tall. A. gigantea is generally found in stream valleys and ravines throughout the southeastern US. A. tecta is a smaller stature species found on the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains. Finally, A. appalachiana is found in more upland areas at the southern end of the Appalachian mountains.
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Guitar: That's the Glory of Love (Including lyrics and chords) As often happens, a tune came into my head a few days ago for no apparent reason as was the case with "That's the Glory of Love", more correctly entitled "The Glory of Love". I sat down with my guitar and worked out my own interpretation straight away. Wikipedia has the following about the song: "The Glory of Love" is a song written by Billy Hill, recorded by Benny Goodman in 1936, whose version was a number one pop hit. Subsequently, the song has been recorded by a vast number of artists, ranging from Dean Martin to Jimmy Durante to Paul McCartney. Bette Midler included the song in her film Beaches (1988) and it appears in the soundtrack recording. In 1951, R&B vocal group, The Five Keys, had their biggest R&B hit with their version of the song, hitting number one on the R&B chart for four non-consecutive weeks. Although The Five Keys recording sold a reported million copies, pressed recordings are very rare. (The title "Glory of Love" was used for another song written by Pete Cetera some fifty years later in 1986) .
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Autoharp: Locked In Blues (Including lyrics and chords) The UK Autoharp challenge for June, set by Jan Brodie is for songs relating to the lock-down situation we find ourselves in during this Covid-19 pandemic. My friend, Max, (Ian Blacklaw Richardson), author of "Scotland Will Flourish", wrote many songs including one called "Locked Out Blues". I feel sure that if he were still alive, he would have altered the lyrics to reflect the present situation, so I have taken the liberty to do so and present it here. Max performed his song at a concert in Laxey a few years ago where I accompanied him on harmonica: https://youtu.be/ouM175zQeis
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Guitar: False Bride (The) (Including lyrics and chords) Back to the BBC programme "Singing Together" for my upload today. "The False Bride" is a variant of the song "I Once Loved a Lass" which I have uploaded in the past. The lyrics tell the same story, but the tune is different. The footnote in the pamphlet reads as follows: Source: Songs Of The West, S Baring Gould Notes: Baring Gould notes: "Words and music taken down from Old Sally Satterly." Known in England mainly as The False Bride or The Week Before Easter. In Scotland it's often called The Forsaken Lover or I Once Loved a Lass, though Jeannie Robertson called her set (where the hero is even more bitter than usual) She's Only My Auld Shoes. It's been found in Ireland as The Lambs on the Green Hills. Both Karpeles and Peacock noted sets in Newfoundland, and the Roud Index lists one from Australia. The song was still current in tradition in the 1960s and 1970s; and may well be to this day. The earliest known examples are broadside issues of the late 17th century.
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Guitar: Sloop John A (Including lyrics and chords) No! It is not a misprint. This is a song that was written by Les Barker as a parody on the well known song "Sloop John B".
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Guitar: Across the Great Divide (Including lyrics and chords) Listening to an instrumental on Soundcloud yesterday played by a very talented autoharp player, Neil Walters, I realized that I had in fact meant to perform this Kate Wolf song myself. I had written out the lyrics and chords for it a couple of weeks ago, but had not recorded it and had let it slip from my memory, so yesterday afternoon, I remedied that omission with this being the result.
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Guitar: Faithful Johnny (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" is "Faithful Johnny". The footnote with the song reads: Source: Singing Together, Spring 1961, BBC Publications Notes: Described somewhat vaguely as 'Old Scottish Song'. From 'The Daily Express Community Song Book'. The singing directions are given as 'Sad, but not too slow.' As with all the songs from this series, I have created my own arrangement and chord progression. To fit in quick changes to the G chord, I simply lift my fingers off as I am only plucking open strings.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Faithful Emma (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" is somewhat confusing. The title is, "Faithful Emma", but nowhere in the song does Emma's name appear, and the first three verses seen to have no connection with the final verse as was noted in the footnotes in the pamphlet: Source: Lucy Broadwood and J A Fuller Maitland. 1893, English County Songs, Leadenhall Press, London Notes: From Sussex. Lucy Broadwood wrote: This fragment is either the beginning and end of one ballad, or the first three verses of one tacked on to the ending of another. The name of the song is that given to it by the choir man who sang it to Mr Sumner, the connection between Emma's faith and Mary's fickleness is not apparent. The chord progression is of my own devising.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Visions of Sugar Plums (Including lyrics and chords) Yesterday I received a request for this song from a new follower, "RaZe Gorky" who is a fan of Glen Campbell. "Visions of Sugar Plums" was written by Glen Campbell and Jerry Fuller and performed by Campbell on his LP "True Grit" which clearly was released after the film starring John Wayne was released. Campbell also starred in that film. I liked the song immediately, so within an hour of receiving the request, recorded this video.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Who Loves the Sun (Including lyrics and chords) My upload today is a request from my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth, who once again has given me a challenge that has taken me out of my comfort zone so to speak. The song, "Who Loves the Sun" written by Lou Reed of "The Velvet Underground", provides me with good practice at using barre chords, which despite playing guitar for over fifty years is a skill I have only recently worked on, and even though it is not a "folk song", I quite liked it, so here is my attempt at it.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: Eriskay Love Lilt (Including lyrics and chords) My song today from the BBC programme "Singing Together", (Spring 1973), is one I have uploaded in the past but on that occasion used a guitar for accompaniment. I decided to try it on the autoharp for this upload. I would normally play and sing this one in the key of C or D, but neither key sounded as good on my Oscar Schmidt chromatic autoharp, so even though it is not the best key for my voice, I am playing it in the key of G. The footnote in the BBC pamphlet reads: The pamphlet acknowledges "the trustees of the estate of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Boosey and Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd, arr. Marjory Kennedy-Fraser from Songs of the Hebrides."
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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Guitar: The Enniskillen Dragoon (Including lyrics and chords) "The Enniskillen Dragoon" is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together". I have uploaded a version of this song previously based on the singing of "The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem", with a strumming accompaniment, but for this version, I have chosen to play it finger-style.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Dives and Lazarus (Including lyrics and chords) My song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" today is "Dives and Lazarus". Wikipedia has the following: Dives and Lazarus is Child ballad 56 and a Christmas carol. Francis James Child collected two variants in The English and Scottish Popular Ballads. It is based on the parable of the rich man and Lazarus (also called "Dives and Lazarus" and found in Luke 16:19-16:31), but the story contains some miraculous elements, and has its emphasis slightly changed from the more traditionally Jewish to a more popularly Western Christian view of the afterlife. As in other popular renderings of the parable, Dives (Latin for rich or splendid) was considered as a proper name, and the name even was changed to Diverus in variant B. I have used the tune from the score in the pamphlet and have made up my own chord progression for my accompaniment.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Dicky of Taunton Dene (Including lyrics and chords) Back to the BBC "Singing Together" programme for today's upload. This is a new song to me, coming from Somerset, a place I have never visited. As usual with these songs from "Singing Together", I have worked out my own accompaniment for it.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: The Weight (Including lyrics and chords) "The Weight" is a song by the American group, "The Band". Attributed to band member Robbie Robertson who was brought up in Canada. Wikipedia has the following explanation regarding some of the characters mentioned in the song: The colorful characters in "The Weight" were based on real people members of The Band knew, as Levon Helm explained in his autobiography, "This Wheel's on Fire". In particular, "young Anna Lee" mentioned in the third verse is Helm's longtime friend Anna Lee Amsden, and, according to her, "Carmen" was from Helm's hometown, Turkey Scratch, Arkansas. "Crazy Chester" was an eccentric resident of Fayetteville, Arkansas, who carried a cap gun. Ronnie Hawkins would tell him to "keep the peace" at his Rockwood Club when Chester arrived.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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12-string Guitar: Summer Holiday (Including lyrics and chords) Even though in the present lock-down conditions, we are not going to be allowed to take a holiday, I thought I would upload this Cliff Richard classic and hopefully lift people's spirits in these strange times. Wikipedia has the following about the song: "Summer Holiday" is a song recorded by Cliff Richard and The Shadows, written by rhythm guitarist Bruce Welch and drummer Brian Bennett. It is taken from the film of the same name, and was released as the second single from the film in February 1963. It went to number one in the UK Singles Chart for a total of three weeks, as had the first single from the film, "The Next Time". After "Summer Holiday" had spent two weeks at number one, The Shadows' instrumental "Foot Tapper" - also from the same film - took over the top spot for one week, before "Summer Holiday" returned to the top spot for one further week. The track is one of Richard's best known titles and it remains a staple of his live shows. It was one of six hits Richard performed at his spontaneous gig at the 1996 Wimbledon Championships when rain stopped the tennis.
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Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
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Guitar:Cuckoo The (Including lyrics and chords) This is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together". I have uploaded the American version of this song in the past, but this is the first time I have come across the original English version. Interestingly, I particularly noted that there are verses in it common to other songs as well, e.g. On Top of Old Smokey The following are from the footnotes with the song in the pamphlet: Source: Baring-Gould, 1895, A Garland of Country Song, London, (reprinted Llanerch 1998) Notes: Baring-Gould wrote: This charming little song is known throughout England. It is to be found, the verses strangely inverted, in an old Garland, "The Sailor's Return", Glasgow, 1802 (B.M. 11621, b 13). Halliwell, in his "Nursery Rhymes," quotes the first verse only. This same verse has got worked into "The Seasons," in "Songs from the West," No 19. Dr Barrett in his "English Folk Songs" includes "The Cuckoo" No 47. But the words as he collected them are confused. The "sycamore tree" is converted into "a sailor so free," and the order with the sanzas is 4,1,2, and a verse that is quite unknown to us. The Glasgow Garland also opens with a verse which we do not think belongs to the song:- A-walking and a-talking, and a-walking was I, To meet my sweet Billy, he'll come by and bye. To meet him in the meadows is all my delight, A-walking and a-talking from morning till night. The significance of the little song seems to be this. The inconstant lover is likened first to a cuckoo that is a rover, and lastly to a sycamore that so early drops its leaves. I have worked out my own chord progression for this, the chords shown being suitable for strumming. However, as I am playing finger-style, the run from F through G7 to C at the end of lines 1, 2 and 4 may give the impression that I stay in C.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Cottage Thatch'd with Straw (Including lyrics and chords) The Cottage Thatch'd with Straw is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together". I have made up my own chord progression for accompaniment to this song. When I change from Am to G, I slide up to the note f#, but as I was not playing an actual chord I have indicated this in the annotations simply with the hash tag #. It is not a song that I have heard, but according to the footnote, it is well known in Devon. The following comes as a footnote to the song: Source: Songs of the West by S. Baring-Gould. Notes: The words and the melody were taken down from John Watts, quarry man, Alder, Thrushleton, Devon. This is one of the best known and, next to 'Widdecombe Fair,' most favourite songs of the Devon peasantry. Mr Kidson has noted the song from a Worcestershire man. We have been unable to trace either words or melody, though neither can be earlier than the beginning of the nineteenth century. The song has all the character of a published composition, and no spontaneous composition of a peasant.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: And You Smiled (Including lyrics and chords) ITV have resurrected an old crime series, Van der Valk, which was set in Amsterdam and stars Marc Warren as the eponymous detective. The original series starred Barry Foster and ran from 1972 to 1992. The theme tune for the original series was "Eye Level", composed by Jack Trombey (a pseudonym of Dutch composer Jan Stoeckart) and performed by the Simon Park Orchestra. It reached number one in the UK singles charts in 1973. Also that year, Matt Monro charted with a vocal version titled "And You Smiled". The theme music for the new series uses some of the phrases from "Eye Level" and this brought back to me Matt Munro's song which I have had a go at here using my autoharp for accompaniment.
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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Guitar: Merchant's Daughter (The) (Including lyrics and chords) Also known as "The Constant Farmer's Son", this is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together". The following is the footnote from the pamphlet: Source: Broadwood, L, 1908, English Traditional Songs and Carols, London, Boosey Notes: Sung by Mr. H Burstow, 1893 Lucy Broadwood wrote: The words are on ballad-sheets by Such and other printers. They should be compared with those of `Bruton Town " (Folk Songs from Somerset, Series i.).Both ballads have for their plot a story strangely like that in Boccaccio's Decameron, which, though versified in delightful and homely fashion by Hans Sachs, is chiefly familiar to English readers through Keats' poem °` Isabella and the Pot of Basil." "Bruton Town" has many more points of likeness to Boccaccio's story than has the foregoing ballad ; but it is possible that both the Somerset and Sussex versions are based on the old tale, seeing that Boccaccio's " Story of Patient Grisilda" survives in doggerel form on a broadside of the 17th century (see Roxburghe Coll.), and that the classics provided much material for the early ballad-makers.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Gulf of Mexico (The) (Including lyrics and chords) One of my subscribers, Johnny Oldham, suggested that I might have a look at this Steve Earle song after watching my last upload of one of his songs, namely "Dixieland". This song relates to the worst environmental disaster ever in American history as described by Wikipedia as follows: The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (also referred to as the BP oil spill, oil leak, or oil disaster; the Gulf of Mexico oil spill; and the Macondo blowout) was an industrial disaster that began on April 20, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico on the BP-operated Macondo Prospect, considered to be the largest marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry and estimated to be 8 percent to 31 percent larger in volume than the previous largest, the Ixtoc I oil spill, also in the Gulf of Mexico. The U.S. federal government estimated the total discharge at 4.9 million barrels (210 million US gal; 780,000 m3). After several failed efforts to contain the flow, the well was declared sealed on September 19, 2010. Reports in early 2012 indicated that the well site was still leaking. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill is regarded as one of the largest environmental disasters in American history.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Why Don't Women Like Me (Including lyrics and chords) Requested by subscriber Athul08, "Why Don't Women Like Me" is a George Formby song which of course he would have performed playing one of his ukulele banjos. As that is an instrument I have never attempted to play, I am accompanying myself on the guitar and have simplified the chord progression to suit. As with most of his songs, this is a bit of a tongue-twister in places and a little risqué at times.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Come Write Me Down (Including lyrics and chords) Today, I am returning to the BBC programme "Singing Together" for my upload. "Come Write Me Down" is a traditional song dating back to at least the seventeenth century. Some of the footnotes with the song are as follows: The early 19th century saw the appearance of a broadside song based on the older one, though much shortened; it was usually called Second Thoughts are Best. That would put the song (with the familiar text) in tradition for around two centuries (it is still sung by the Copper Family of Rottingdean, of course), though it may perhaps have been lurking around unremarked-upon in an intermediate form during the 18th century. The tune prescribed on the 17th century broadside was Love's Tide (a popular tune in various forms; Simpson, The British Broadside Ballad and Its Music, 1966, pp. 749-752, quotes three examples. It was used for a good few songs of the latter 17th century, including Laurence Price's Famous Flower of Serving-Men) and If You Love Me was successful enough for its title to have become attached to the melody at times. I am sure that this tune must have influenced the composer of the Manx song "Ramsey Town", (lyrics by E Crabb), as the first two lines are virtually the same for both.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Crazy (Including lyrics and chords) I was adding songs by Willie Nelson to a playlist on my channel the other day when I noticed that although I have played and sung his song "Crazy" on many occasions, the only version of it I had uploaded to YouTube was one accompanied on the autoharp, so today I am uploading this guitar accompanied version.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: Fish and Whistle (Including lyrics and chords) Just over a week ago, American country singer and song writer John Prine died of complications caused by COVID-19. This song, "Fish and Whistle" is one of his that I particularly love, and although I have uploaded a guitar accompanied version a few years ago, I have recorded this autoharp accompanied version as my tribute to him.
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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Guitar: Cruel, Cruel World (Including lyrics and chords) Requested by subscriber, Muikku, "Cruel, Cruel World" is a song written by Daniel Lanois and sung by Willie Nelson for the video game "Red Dead Redemption 2". I have done two or three other songs from this franchise before, so was happt to give this one a go too, even if like the others it was new to me.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: Where Are You Going with The Rain (Including lyrics and chords) I know very little about this song other than that it was written by John Stewart of The Kingston Trio and I first heard it on one of their LPs, "Something Else". I may have misremembered the title as I think it should have been: "Where Are You Going Little Boy?" It is another song that fits Jan's challenge on the UK Autoharp site on Facebook for songs to do with the weather. I have never attempted this one on the autoharp before, so I gave it a go yesterday.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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Guitar: Tonight the Streets Are Ours (Including lyrics and chords) This is another request from my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth. The song, "Tonight the Streets Are Ours" was written and performed by Richard Hawley about whom Wikipedia has the following: Richard Willis Hawley (born 17 January 1967) is an English singer-songwriter, guitarist, and producer. After his first band Treebound Story (formed while he was still at school) broke up, Hawley found success as a member of Britpop band Longpigs in the 1990s. After that group broke up in 2000, he later joined the band Pulp, led by his friend Jarvis Cocker, for a short time. Hawley's track "Tonight The Streets Are Ours" was chosen as the title track for the Oscar nominated 2010 Banksy film Exit Through the Gift Shop . I have chosen to play this one with a finger-style accompaniment for my own interpretation.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Windy Harbour (Including lyrics and chords) A few days ago, I heard this song for the first time ever sung by a lady autoharpist, Julia Mara, on the UK Autoharp Group page of Facebook. I liked the song so much, I decided I needed to learn it for myself, but would use the guitar for accompaniment rather than the autoharp as she had already done it with that instrument. Windy Harbour was written by Pete Abbott, guitarist with The John Wright Band, and it is on a live performance of his that I have based my own interpretation, though he used a strumming accompaniment as opposed to my finger-style one. The chord progression I am using is one I found supplied by Ian Hendrie on a thread on Mudcat.org.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: Strange Rain (Including lyrics and chords) Tom Paxton wrote "Strange Rain" as a protest song long before people became more aware of the dangers of atmospheric pollution. I have taken the liberty of adding two new verses to his song in keeping with the present strange times. As it happens, it also fits Jan's April challenge for songs about the weather.
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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Guitar: Midlist Author (Including lyrics and chords) This song comes as a request from my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth. Written and performed by Colin Meloy of The Decemberists. The song is called "Midlist Author". I had problems with it because as far as I could find, there is only the one version of it on YouTube, a live concert with Colin Meloy himself playing and singing the song. However, the lyrics he was singing did not match up to those I had found on the internet, and it did not help when he forgot the lyrics part way through the first verse. However, eventually I spotted that one kind person had added the lyrics he was singing in the comments below the video, so I was finally able to work out how to put the song together. It gave me the chance to practise using barre chords too, playing A, Am and F#m up the neck for the verses.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: What Have They Done to The Rain ) (Including lyrics and chords) I felt that I was cheating a bit when I uploaded a song for "Jan's Challenge" of songs about the weather on the UK Autoharp site the other day, having already uploaded that one a year ago, so I decided to have a go at a new one, Malvina Reynolds' song, "What Have They Done to The Rain". I only tried it out a couple of times before recording it, so it is by no means perfect. I first heard this song when a friend at college played and sang it one summer's evening in 1965 or so. Strangely, just as he finished the song, a gentle rain began to fall outside of our room.
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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Guitar: Collier's Rant (Including lyrics and chords) Back to the BBC programme "Singing Together" today for my upload. There was quite a bit of information about the song in the footnotes in the pamphlet including a very useful glossary of dialect words used in it: Source: Palmer, R,A Ballad History of England,BT Batsford Ltd, 1979 Notes: The text was first published in the Northumbrain Garland of 1793. The text and tune together were published in The Bishoprick Garland editor J Ritson, in 1834. Roy Palmer provides these translations of the dialect: Marrow: workmate Deel: Devil Putten the tram: pushing the coal truck Lowe: light Gam: game Law: low Had up: hold up Hoggars: stockings with the feet cut off, used as gaiters Sark: shirt The song is adopted as the book title by Robert Colls: The Collier's Rant: Song and Culture in the Industrial Village (Croom Helm/Rowman & Littlefield, 1977). "The Collier's Rant" (the same version with some minor differences) is also in Allan's Illustrated Edition of Tyneside Songs ([1862, revised edition, 1891]; Facsimile edition, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne: Frank Graham, 1972, pp. 25-26; without music), with this note [the date of Ritson's book is different]: Sir Cuthbert Sharpe writes:--"This is a true pit song, which singers can do justice to. Those who have had the advantage of hearing it sung by the late Mr. W.S--, sen., of Pictree, will not readily forget the marvellous effect he produced on his hearers by his powerful voice and genuine humour." The song appeared in Cuthbert Sharpe's Bishoprick Garland (1834), not to be confused with Joseph Ritson's Bishopric Garland (1784). Ritson printed the song, without tune, in his Northumberland Garland (1793, song XIII).
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Dock of the Bay (Including lyrics and chords) They say "You're never too old to learn!". I started learning to play guitar over fifty years ago, and for over forty-five of those years, never really ventured up the neck, sticking to simple open chords because I didn't learn how to play barre chords. Now in my seventies, I am trying to use barre chords more often, even though I have never been able to play a full barre but have settled for a grip barre instead. The Otis Redding song, "Dock of the Bay", co-written by guitarist Steve Cropper, gives me the opportunity to practice using barre chords for G and A in the verses and chorus, though I do go back to an open G chord in the bridge.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: The Animals Went in Two by Two (Including lyrics and chords) This song was suggested by subscriber Jack Carter who is looking after a young cousin at the present time. I had not done it before, so set to as soon as I got the request even though I prefer to record in daylight rather than under electric light. The tune for the song of course is that of the American Civil War song "When Johnny Comes Marching Home".
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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2020 January walks in the Isle of Man I had intended to stop making these videos of the monthly walks I have been on with the Manx Footpaths Conservation Group, but in light of the events that have overtaken the world in recent weeks and the Government’s recommendation that we self-isolate, I feel it only right to take you on a virtual walk by making this video. Of course, all the photos were taken in the month of January, well before we knew about the Covid-19 virus. They are but a few highlights from each of the walks undertaken during the month. The music accompanying the video is a compilation of tracks from songs I uploaded during the same period. If you would like to see more of the photos from all my walks, go to https://photos.google.com/albums If you would like to listen to more of my songs, they can be found on my YouTube channel, "threelegsoman". The musical tracks accompanying the video are: 1. January, April and Me – Guitar 2. Granny’s Old Armchair – 12-string Guitar 3. That Cause Can Never Be Lost nor Stayed – Guitar 4. The Closest Thing to Crazy – Guitar 5. Deadman’s Gun – Guitar 6. Puff the Magic Dragon (With happy ending) – Guitar 7. Moonshine in the West Virginia Hills – 5-string Banjo 8. Vincent – Guitar 9. That’s the Way It Is – 12-string Guitar 10. You Can’t Go Back Again – 12-string Guitar 11. Farewell Shanty - Guitar
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar/5-string banjo/12-string guitar
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Autoharp: The Circle Game (Including lyrics and chords) I have done a guitar accompanied version of this Joni Mitchell song which I uploaded in 2013. I was looking at my file of the song yesterday and decided that it might work with the autoharp, and as one of my Facebook friends in America, Martin Buck, sent me a message saying how much he and friends have been missing my autoharp uploads, I have done this version especially for him. It is in the key of Bb which is a key I don't often play in on the autoharp, so it is a good exercise for me too.
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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Guitar and Harmonica: Summertime (Including lyrics and chords) Whilst I have uploaded videos of this song before, I have never attempted to put both the singing and guitar together with the harmonica, so today I am experimenting doing so. Also, with the guitar accompaniment, I have tried using barre chords for the run down from Am through G and F to Em, as for over 40 years, I never attempted to play barre chords and am now making myself do so more often. The harmonica is an A minor diatonic from Lee Oskar. The song of course comes from the Gershwin opera "Porgy and Bess".
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar/harmonica
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Guitar: South Australia (The Codfish Shanty) I uploaded a variant of this song some time ago under the title: "Cape Cod Girls", which I had found on a site called "The Contemplator". Today's upload comes from the BBC programme "Singing Together" where the footnote reads: Source: Hugill, S, Shanties from the Seven Seas,Mystic Seaport Museum, 1960.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Coming Home to Stay (Including lyrics and chords) Also known as "The Vermont Home Song", "Coming Home to Stay" is a request from Caleb Brown for whom I uploaded the song "They Call the Wind Mariah" a couple of days ago. Written by Terry Frey, as I was unable to find the lyrics and chords from my usual sources, I copied the lyrics from Terry's own video, (the only version of the song I could find on YouTube). The chord progression I am using is of my own devising. Terry dedicates the song in the following words: Out of respect for the military who serve from Vermont and come back home to their families and friends. You are remembered with this song.......
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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5-string banjo: Waiting for the Federals and Sugar in the Gourd I usually try to upload something with an Irish connection for St Patrick's Day, but I do not have anything new of that nature at present, so instead I am uploading a set of two American tunes which I am working on at present. I hope to be able to play these with my fiddle playing friend Robin Boyle soon, but am still trying to build up speed. This is my first attempt at putting the two tunes together. I should point out that Sugar in the Gourd is Robin's own arrangement of this piece.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - 5-string banjo
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Guitar: They Call the Wind Mariah (Including lyrics and chords) Suggested by Caleb Brown, "They Call the Wind Mariah" is an American popular song with lyrics written by Alan J. Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe for their 1951 Broadway musical, Paint Your Wagon, which is set in the California Gold Rush. The song was featured in the 1969 Hollywood film Paint Your Wagon, starring Lee Marvin, Clint Eastwood and Jean Seberg. In the film, the song was performed by Harve Presnell. The New York Times said that Presnell's role in the film "delivered the golden opportunity to sing the unforgettable ballad." I note that "Mariah" is a more recent spelling of the name which was originally "Maria", but as the latter is usually pronounced as "Mar-ee-ya", and in the song the name is pronounced as "Mar-eye-ya", I feel the former spelling is more appropriate.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Lady Take Your Time (Including lyrics and chords) "Lady Take Your Time" is a song written and performed by Allan Taylor. It is a song that my friend Margaid Bird sings and asks me to accompany her, so I thought it about time I did my own version which I present here.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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12-string Guitar: Irish Rover (Including lyrics and chords) In the past, I have sung "The Irish Rover" as I learned it from the singing of The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem, but today, I am uploading a version which whilst mainly theirs, also includes verses that the Dubliners sang.
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Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
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12-string Guitar: Sweet Caroline (Including lyrics and chords) A request from my American pen-friend, Tammy Statler, has me attempting Neil Diamond's song "Sweet Caroline". I have sung along to others performing this song before, but this is my own first attempt at it.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
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Guitar: Dixieland (Including lyrics and chords) My friend Alan Hess introduced this song to us on one of our Tuesday night sing-arounds a couple of weeks ago. It was written by Steve Earle, and like his song "Galway Girl", he includes a lively instrumental between each verse. In the case of "Galway Girl", I could play the instrumental breaks on a harmonica, but with this song, I have attempted to play the instrumental break on my guitar, but am not as good as Steve Earle who plays his on a mandolin.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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12-string Guitar: If I Had a Hammer (Including lyrics and chords) For our sing-around on Tuesday night, we had a theme of "protest songs", and this was one of the songs I sang. I had uploaded the song previously, but this time I have altered the chord progression slightly. Wikipedia has the following about the song: "If I Had a Hammer (The Hammer Song)" is a song written by Pete Seeger and Lee Hays. It was written in 1949 in support of the progressive movement, and was first recorded by The Weavers, a folk music quartet composed of Seeger, Hays, Ronnie Gilbert, and Fred Hellerman. It was a number 10 hit for Peter, Paul and Mary in 1962 and then went to number three a year later when recorded by Trini Lopez. The Weavers released the song under the title "The Hammer Song" as a 78 single in March 1950 on Hootenanny Records, 101-A, backed with "Banks of Marble".
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Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
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Guitar: Cold Blows the Wind (Shropshire) (Including lyrics and chords) Collected by Cecil Sharp, "Cold Blows the Wind (Shropshire)" is one of many variants on the song "The Unquiet Grave". This is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" and in the footnotes, is the following: The tune here was noted by Sharp from Mrs William Ree at Hambridge, Somerset, 4th April 1904, and was first published in the Journal of the Folk Song Society, vol. II issue 6, 1905. The simple chord progression I am using is of my own devising.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Listen to the Ocean (Including lyrics and chords) At our monthly meeting of the Manx Autoharp Group, my friend Beastie sang this song which was a minor hit in 1960 for the duo, Nina and Frederik. I have chosen to accompany myself on the guitar as that is the instrument Frederik played for their performance.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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12-string Guitar: The Old Bog Road (Including lyrics and chords). The Old Bog Road has been requested by my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth. Ken liked the Hank Locklin version of the song, but having listened to various artists, I preferred the ones done by the likes of Finbar Furey, Daniel O'Donnell and earlier, Joshef Locke, so my own interpretation is more like theirs. I made up my own chord progression to accompany the song. The lyrics for the song come from a poem written by Teresa Brayton, (29 June 1868 – 1943) who was an Irish nationalist, writer and poet. andit was set to music by Madeline King O'Farrelly from Rochfortbridge, County Westmeath.
Received lots of comments & props
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1,134  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
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Guitar: Who's Sorry Now (Including lyrics and chords) Music composed by Ted Snyder, with lyrics by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby (published in 1923), "Who's Sorry Now?" is a song closely idenfified with Connie Francis who had a hit with it in 1958 reaching number 4 in the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the USA and number 1 in the UK singles chart. It's first release in 1923 was performed by Isham Jones whose version charted at number 3. It featured in the Marx Brothers film A Night in Casablanca (1946), directed by Archie Mayo and released by United Artists. It was also used in the 1950 film Three Little Words when it was sung by Gloria DeHaven. This is just a bit of self indulgence on my part as I wanted to try it out to see if it might suit my friend Sylvia who sings with our group of musical friends who entertain at various care homes, sheltered accommodation homes and other venues.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Room in the Sky (Including lyrics and chords) The Houghton Weavers are a favourite group of a friend of mine, and he introduced me to one of their songs, "Room in the Sky", when he came to visit last week.It is a rather sad reflection on modern living in cities where the old streets have been demolished in favour of high-rise flats. The sense of "local community" seems to have gone.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Desperados Waitin' For a Train (Including lyrics and chords) "Desperados Waitin' For a Train" is a song written by Guy Clark which I first heard sung by Willie Nelson. I did upload a version about six and a half years ago, but have decided to do it again, this time playing the G chord as a barre chord, (grip barre in my case) at the end of each verse as this makes the sequence G - F# - Em much easier to play.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Shady Grove (Including lyrics and chords) Suggested by subscriber, "Mike", Shady Grove is a traditional American song that I thought I must surely have uploaded before now, but by some oversight, I had not done so. There are many versions of it, this one I have based on the singing and playing of Doc Watson. There are a number of small townships in various states in the USA called Shady Grove, but in this song, Shady Grove is the name of a young lady.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: The Hills of Ellan Vannin (Including lyrics and chords) Last week on Facebook, the group "Culture Vannin" posted a poem, "The Hills of Ellan Vannin", written by Josephine Kermode (1852–1937) who was a Manx poet and playwright better known by the pen name "Cushag". I felt that it should be set to music and composed this tune for it, though somebody else may have composed one already, but if so, I am not aware of it. I hope you like my composition. If you would like the sheet music, I can let you have a PDF copy which I will send if you email me at nuncton@hotmail,com
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Come and Get It (Including lyrics and chords) My apologies to subscriber Doug Shanahan for taking so long to getting round to uploading this song which he requested a month ago. A reminder from Doug had me check it out again last night and this is the result even though I usually prefer to record in daylight. Wikipedia has the following about the song: "Come and Get It" is a song composed by English singer-songwriter Paul McCartney for the 1969 film The Magic Christian. The song was performed by Badfinger, produced by McCartney and issued as a single 5 December 1969 in the UK, and 12 January 1970 in the US, on the Beatles' Apple label. It was the band's first release under the Badfinger name (having previously recorded as The Iveys) and was their international breakthrough, hitting the top 10 in both the UK and US singles charts. Paul McCartney recorded a solo demo of the song on 24 July 1969, after arriving early for a Beatles recording session for their Abbey Road album. Singing the double-tracked lead vocal and playing all the instruments, he laid down the vocals and piano on the first take, sang again and played maracas on the first overdub, then added drums, and finally put in the bass guitar track. It took less than an hour to finish.[1] The biggest differences between the McCartney and Badfinger versions are a slower tempo and slightly higher key on the demo, and the use of three-part harmonies on the Badfinger single. In my version, because I could never manage to play a barre chord properly, I play B as xx444x, C as xx555x and the final E as xx999x
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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12-string Guitar: Trains and Boats and Planes (Including lyrics and chords) "Trains and Boats and Planes" is a song I chose to perform a couple of weeks ago at our themed sing-around session at The Manor Hotel in Willaston, Douglas. The theme for that session had been "Methods of Transport". The song was composed by Burt Bacharach with lyrics by Hal David, and I remember it being performed by the British band: Billy J Kramer and the Dakotas on this side of "The Pond" who recorded it in 1965. It was a minor hit for the American singer Dionne Warwick in the States, reaching number 22 in the billboard charts in 1966. I have based my own interpretation on the Warwick version. When I wrote out the annotations which are included on screen, I made an error in the final verses which should have been: G Gsus4 G Gsus4 G Hmmmmmmmm……………………………………… Gsus4 C Csus4 C Hmmmmmmmm…………………… Csus4 G Gsus4 G Hmmmmmmmm………………………… Gsus4 Em The trains and the boats and planes G Em Will bring you back, back home to me For those not familiar with Gsus4 and C sus4, I play them as follows: Gsus4 = 320010 Csus4 = xx2011
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Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
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Guitar: Ode to Billy Joe (Including lyrics and chords) My friend and neighbour, Corinna, asked me if I could do this song written and performed by Bobby Gentry, so although it is really a song for a lady to sing, I have given it a go. I am using a chord progression as suggested in Ultimate Guitar, though some interpretations use D9 rather than D7.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Red (Including lyrics and chords) Subscriber "Muikku" has requested another song by Daniel Lanois written for the video game, "Red Dead Redemption 2". Having previously uploaded "That's the Way it Is" and "Deadman's Gun", two more songs from the "Red Dead Redemption" franchise, I was happy to give this one a go too. Trying to work out where the chord change from C to F was a little tricky, so I put a dash in the lines to remind myself where to change.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Cicely Sweet (Including lyrics and chords) "Cicely Sweet" is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together". The footnote with the song reads: Source: Songs of the West by S. Baring-Gould. Notes: Notes abridged from S.Baring-Gould. Words and air sent me by J. S. Hurrell, Esq., Kingsbridge, who had learned them from Mr A. Holoran, a Devonshire schoolmaster. It is also published as 'Sylvia Sweet' in Dale's 'Collection,' circ. 1790. Two verses are given by Halliwell as traditional in his 'Nursery Rhymes,' 4th edition, 1846, p223. Roud: 6908 (Search Roud index at VWML) The song is meant to be sung by two people, a man and a woman, so I have sung the male part in a low register and the female part an octave higher.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: The Cheshire Man (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme, "Singing Together" is "The Cheshire Man" which is also known as "The Cheshire Souling Song". Other than its title, I have no further information regarding it except the single line from the pamphlet: Taken from E. Jones "Popular Cheshire Melodies", 1798. As with most of the songs in Joe Offer's catalogue of songs from the programme, the sheet music with audio enabled me to learn the tune, but the chord progression I have used is of my own devising. I transposed from the original key of Fm to Am as it suits my voice better.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: Ivor the Driver (Including lyrics and chords) Seeking a song to fit a theme of "prepositions", Ian White suggested I should give this one a go. It is usually sung a cappella, but I worked out a simple two chord progression that seems to fit so I could accompany it on the autoharp. It happens to fit Jan's challenge for February on the UK Autoharp site too.
Received lots of comments & props
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1,041  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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